A Pleasant Discovery

For the past couple months I have neglected The Safely Working Project, at least from a web standpoint. But, I have a good excuse–I’m teaching at Slippery Rock University in the Department osru-tswpf Safety Management this academic year. After walking up and down the hall outside my office the past two months, I finally took a look at the bulletin board and to my surprise there was one of my posters. I had given out several posters at a conference at IUP two years ago. Seeing the poster was certainly gratifying and a nudge to get back online. I anticipate making a very exciting announcement about The Safely Working Project in a few weeks. Stay tuned!

 

©2016 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” and “Safely Working” are registered trademarks of Trailmarker Ltd.
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The Safely Working Project is focused wholly on employees and their health and well-being in the workplace.  The Project promotes useful guidance that does not depend on a safety professional or staff to facilitate in the workplace.

The Safely Working Project envisions a path to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

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A “New View” Bibliography…… (at least the start of one)

I spent the better part of three months last fall immersed in the “New View.”  I listened, read and researched the “New View” with the intent to absorb the philosophy into my on-going efforts developing The Safely Working Project.  I bought into it from the beginning as it was already compatible with my personal values and approach to workplace safety.

(The Safely Working Project is focused on the sharp end of the stick, but at a more basic level.  The Project is dedicated to developing and providing tools that employees and supervisors can use for Safely Working all the time.  While so much of the discussion about the “New View” revolves around operational excellence and highly reliable organizations, the mission of The Safely Working Project targets organizations that are still working at the basics of workplace safety.  If you’ve read my other posts on “Safely Leading” you know that I have adapted key aspects of the “New View” philosophy for such organizations.)

A huge part of that investment of time was listening to all the Pre-Accident Podcasts produced and presented by Todd Conklin.  (http://preaccidentpodcast.podbean.com/)  A veritable cornucopia of information and knowledge presented in 30 minute chunks.  The podcasts and several books were key to the framing of “Safely Leading,” my presentation of a subset of the “New View” philosophy for small organizations striving to build and maintain a positive workplace.

While listening to the podcasts I kept lots of notes.  In particular, I kept a list of all the books that were directly or peripherally discussed.  Many of the books are about the “New View” while others represent other useful related topics.   Here is that list for your reading pleasure:

6-Hour Safety Culture, Tim Autrey, 2015

A Life in Error: From Little Slips to Big Disasters, James Reason, 2013

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder, Nassim Nicholas Taleb, 2014

Beyond Blame: Learning from Failure and Success, Dave Zwieback, 2015

Dave’s Subs: A Novel Story About Workplace Accountability, David Marx, 2015

FRAM: The Functional Resonance Analysis Method: Modelling Complex Socio-technical Systems, Erik Hollnagel, 2012

Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap…And Others Don’t, Jim Collins, 2001

Human Error, James Reason, 1990

Humble Inquiry: The Gentle Art of Asking Instead of Telling, Edgar Schein, 2013

In Pursuit of Foresight: Disaster Incubation Theory Re-Imagined, Mike Lauder, 2015

Information Processing and Human-Machine Interaction: An Approach to Cognitive Engineering, Jens Rasmussen, 1986

Just Culture, 2nd ed., Sidney Dekker, 2012

Manage the Unexpected, 2nd ed., Weick & Sutcliffe, 2007

Managing the Risks of Organizational Accidents, James Reason, 1997

Organizational Culture and Leadership, Edgar Schein, 2010

Pre-Accident Investigations, Todd Conklin, 2012

Safety-I and Safety-II: The Past and Future of Safety Management, New edition, Erik Hollnagel, 2014

Simple Revolutionary Acts, Todd Conklin, 2004

Team Leadership in High-Hazard Environments: Performance, Safety and Risk Management Strategies for Operational Teams, Randy Cadieux, 2014

The Checklist Manifesto – How to Get Things Right, Atul Gawande, 2009

The Field Guide to Understanding ‘Human Error’, Sidney Dekker, 2014

The Fifth Discipline: The art and practice of the learning organization, Peter Senge, 2006

The High-Velocity Edge: How Market Leaders Leverage Operational Excellence to Beat the Competition, Steven J Spear, 2010

The Human Condition, James Reason, 2008

The Myth of Multitasking: How “Doing It All” Gets Nothing Done, Dave Crenshaw, 2008

The Wisdom of Crowds, James Surowiecki, 2005

Thinking Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman, 2011

Whack-a-Mole: The Price We Pay For Expecting Perfection, David Marx, 2012

 

Here are some additional publications that were alluded to or mentioned in the podcasts:

Human Performance Reference Manual, INPO 06-003, October 2006 (http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/4552567/1363825418/name/Human+Performance+Improvement+Course+Reference+Manual+06-003.pdf)

Human Performance Improvement Handbook, Volume 1: Concepts and Principles, DOE-HDBK-1028-2009, June 2009, (http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2013/06/f1/doe-hdbk-1028-2009_volume1.pdf)

Human Performance Improvement Handbook, Volume 2: Human Performance Tools for individuals, Work teams, and Management, DOE-HDBK-1028-2009, June 2009, (http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2013/06/f1/doe-hdbk-1028-2009_volume2.pdf)

Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations, IAEA-TECDOC-1329, December 2002, (http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/te_1329_web.pdf)

Health and Safety Critical Control Management – Good Practice Guide, ICMM, 2015, (https://www.icmm.com/publications/health-and-safety-critical-control-management-good-practice-guide)

 

Great recommendations from commenters:

Drift Into Failure, Sidney Dekker, 2011

Resilience Engineering: Concepts and Precepts,
Hollnagel, Woods, Leveson, 2006

Controlling the Controllable: Preventing Business Upsets,
Joe Groeneweg, 2002

Behind Human Error (2nd edition), Woods, Dekker, Cook. Johannesen & Sarter, 2010

Ten Questions About Human Error: A New View of Human Factors and System Safety, Sidney Dekker, 2004

Resilience Engineering Perspectives, Vol 1: Remaining Sensitive to the Possibility of Failure, Sidney Dekker, 2008

Resilience Engineering Perspectives, Vol 2: Preparation and Restoration, Nemeth, Hollnagel & Dekker, 2009

Resilience Engineering in Practise: A Guidebook, Hollnagel, Paries, Woods & Wreathall, 2011

 

 

©2016 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” and “Safely Working” are registered trademarks of Trailmarker Ltd.
∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

The Safely Working Project is focused wholly on employees and their health and well-being in the workplace.  The Project promotes useful guidance that does not depend on a safety professional or staff to facilitate in the workplace.

The Safely Working Project envisions a path to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

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Safety as a Forlorn Hope……

Safety BookshelfRecently, I organized my “safety” bookshelf after gathering several stacks of books scattered around my office.  I have accumulated a significant library over the years in support of my training, safety and industrial hygiene activities.  Many are recommended references and textbooks for the environmental, health and safety profession.  Click on the photo to get a closer look at the titles.

It occurred to me that my bookshelf provides additional evidence of why many managers and company owners see a barrier when it comes to safety.   I don’t mean the expense involved in buying the books.  I’m referring to the implied expertise required to find, interpret and apply the appropriate information and guidance.   It’s not unlike the perception of a “forlorn hope.”  This perception suggests that safety is not without great perseverance and incredible expense.

Are these books required for establishing and building a Safely Working™ Environment in a workplace?  Is safety really a “forlorn hope?”  Certainly not.  I’m confident many successful safety programs have been established without these books, even before the Internet existed.  A Safely Working™ Environment is more than safety, it’s how things get done.  It doesn’t take a huge budget to make it happen.

That doesn’t mean these books aren’t useful.  They’re great when you have a program already.  They are very helpful when you know what you need.   But, if you aren’t sure what you are looking for, these books can be overwhelming.  That’s why The Safely Working Project is focused on assisting employers build a Safely Working™ Environment in their place of work.

It doesn’t take books to create a Safely Working™ Environment.  It takes supervisors and employees using “Sensible Care.”  Safe 6® needs to be the one workplace rule that rules them all!   It really works when an employer is committed to Safely Working™ 100% of the Time.  It doesn’t take a technical library to do it.

start here (Mobile)

 

 

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6″ is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

 

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Time for a Recap. Actually, it’s quite overdue……

Time for a Recap, although a nightcap sounds better!  It’s been several weeks since the last substantive post about The Safely Working Project.  Now that the snow has melted it’s time to recap what we’ve covered and what you might expect in the coming weeks.

The Safely Working Project is all about building and maintaining a Safely Working Environment.  We introduced it in “It All Started Out With A Bang!”  In short, the environment consists of 6 aspects that shape the Environment.  These are Avoidance – Activities – Awareness – Abilities – Attitude, and Assets.

Activities were described in “Safe 6 ‘Approved’ MOTELS……”  The MOTELS represent the variety of activities and conditions in the workplace that may present some level of danger to employees.  Go back to the original post and you’ll see it’s pretty self-explanatory.  However, it’s one thing to have a list of potential dangers, it’s another to sort through them and figure out how likely they are to be a real problem.  An upcoming post will address in simple terms how to judge the degree of danger associated with any of the MOTELS.

Several posts discussed Safe 6.  If you remember we recommended that Safe 6 be the one rule to rule them all in the workplace.  This is because it is a universal definition of the skills and abilities employees can use to be safely working.  If you want to review this go to the Safe 6 Pack post.

Little has been said about awareness so far.  That’s not because it isn’t important, because it is very important.  Awareness is the foundational knowledge and information an employer needs to build the Safely Working Environment.  We’ve purposefully dragged our feet on this topic because it is more of an under the hood” discussion.   We intend to get to that information soon.

Avoidance of mishaps is another area that’s been neglected.  On one hand, it should be obvious why mishaps and the resulting injuries must be avoided.  They are expensive, very expensive.  Yet, for many employers avoidance represents their efforts to ignore safety measures and training because of the expense and impact on productivity.  You can expect a post laying out the costs of mishaps.

The last two aspects of the Safely Working Environment are assets and attitude.  While the first four aspects depend on the employer to manage, these two are more representative of the employee’s character and expectations.  While we haven’t discussed these two in any detail, they are the subject of our 2015 theme – Safely Working Protects Your Lifestyle.  We’ve summed it all up on our new Poster.  Check it out.  We’ll probably put it to words sometime this year.

There you have it…… actually, there are number of other posts planned that are more “under the hood” in nature but reflect efforts an employer will inevitably address as they build their Safely Working Environment.  Look for posts about the Priorities of Safely Working and Employee Training – Where to Stop – Where to Start.

See you soon!!!!!!

 

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

 

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The Meadville Tribune – Vision Edition 2/22/15

We had the opportunity to promote The Safely Working Project in The Meadville Tribune in February.  Here is a copy of the article we supplied to The Tribune.  We are grateful for the opportunity to publicize our efforts.  As we’ve posted in the past, safety isn’t sexy, but who can ignore free assistance that will promote Safely Working?

Vision-022215

 

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

 

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