A “New View” Bibliography…… (at least the start of one)

I spent the better part of three months last fall immersed in the “New View.”  I listened, read and researched the “New View” with the intent to absorb the philosophy into my on-going efforts developing The Safely Working Project.  I bought into it from the beginning as it was already compatible with my personal values and approach to workplace safety.

(The Safely Working Project is focused on the sharp end of the stick, but at a more basic level.  The Project is dedicated to developing and providing tools that employees and supervisors can use for Safely Working all the time.  While so much of the discussion about the “New View” revolves around operational excellence and highly reliable organizations, the mission of The Safely Working Project targets organizations that are still working at the basics of workplace safety.  If you’ve read my other posts on “Safely Leading” you know that I have adapted key aspects of the “New View” philosophy for such organizations.)

A huge part of that investment of time was listening to all the Pre-Accident Podcasts produced and presented by Todd Conklin.  (http://preaccidentpodcast.podbean.com/)  A veritable cornucopia of information and knowledge presented in 30 minute chunks.  The podcasts and several books were key to the framing of “Safely Leading,” my presentation of a subset of the “New View” philosophy for small organizations striving to build and maintain a positive workplace.

While listening to the podcasts I kept lots of notes.  In particular, I kept a list of all the books that were directly or peripherally discussed.  Many of the books are about the “New View” while others represent other useful related topics.   Here is that list for your reading pleasure:

6-Hour Safety Culture, Tim Autrey, 2015

A Life in Error: From Little Slips to Big Disasters, James Reason, 2013

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder, Nassim Nicholas Taleb, 2014

Beyond Blame: Learning from Failure and Success, Dave Zwieback, 2015

Dave’s Subs: A Novel Story About Workplace Accountability, David Marx, 2015

FRAM: The Functional Resonance Analysis Method: Modelling Complex Socio-technical Systems, Erik Hollnagel, 2012

Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap…And Others Don’t, Jim Collins, 2001

Human Error, James Reason, 1990

Humble Inquiry: The Gentle Art of Asking Instead of Telling, Edgar Schein, 2013

In Pursuit of Foresight: Disaster Incubation Theory Re-Imagined, Mike Lauder, 2015

Information Processing and Human-Machine Interaction: An Approach to Cognitive Engineering, Jens Rasmussen, 1986

Just Culture, 2nd ed., Sidney Dekker, 2012

Manage the Unexpected, 2nd ed., Weick & Sutcliffe, 2007

Managing the Risks of Organizational Accidents, James Reason, 1997

Organizational Culture and Leadership, Edgar Schein, 2010

Pre-Accident Investigations, Todd Conklin, 2012

Safety-I and Safety-II: The Past and Future of Safety Management, New edition, Erik Hollnagel, 2014

Simple Revolutionary Acts, Todd Conklin, 2004

Team Leadership in High-Hazard Environments: Performance, Safety and Risk Management Strategies for Operational Teams, Randy Cadieux, 2014

The Checklist Manifesto – How to Get Things Right, Atul Gawande, 2009

The Field Guide to Understanding ‘Human Error’, Sidney Dekker, 2014

The Fifth Discipline: The art and practice of the learning organization, Peter Senge, 2006

The High-Velocity Edge: How Market Leaders Leverage Operational Excellence to Beat the Competition, Steven J Spear, 2010

The Human Condition, James Reason, 2008

The Myth of Multitasking: How “Doing It All” Gets Nothing Done, Dave Crenshaw, 2008

The Wisdom of Crowds, James Surowiecki, 2005

Thinking Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman, 2011

Whack-a-Mole: The Price We Pay For Expecting Perfection, David Marx, 2012

 

Here are some additional publications that were alluded to or mentioned in the podcasts:

Human Performance Reference Manual, INPO 06-003, October 2006 (http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/4552567/1363825418/name/Human+Performance+Improvement+Course+Reference+Manual+06-003.pdf)

Human Performance Improvement Handbook, Volume 1: Concepts and Principles, DOE-HDBK-1028-2009, June 2009, (http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2013/06/f1/doe-hdbk-1028-2009_volume1.pdf)

Human Performance Improvement Handbook, Volume 2: Human Performance Tools for individuals, Work teams, and Management, DOE-HDBK-1028-2009, June 2009, (http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2013/06/f1/doe-hdbk-1028-2009_volume2.pdf)

Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations, IAEA-TECDOC-1329, December 2002, (http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/te_1329_web.pdf)

Health and Safety Critical Control Management – Good Practice Guide, ICMM, 2015, (https://www.icmm.com/publications/health-and-safety-critical-control-management-good-practice-guide)

 

Great recommendations from commenters:

Drift Into Failure, Sidney Dekker, 2011

Resilience Engineering: Concepts and Precepts,
Hollnagel, Woods, Leveson, 2006

Controlling the Controllable: Preventing Business Upsets,
Joe Groeneweg, 2002

Behind Human Error (2nd edition), Woods, Dekker, Cook. Johannesen & Sarter, 2010

Ten Questions About Human Error: A New View of Human Factors and System Safety, Sidney Dekker, 2004

Resilience Engineering Perspectives, Vol 1: Remaining Sensitive to the Possibility of Failure, Sidney Dekker, 2008

Resilience Engineering Perspectives, Vol 2: Preparation and Restoration, Nemeth, Hollnagel & Dekker, 2009

Resilience Engineering in Practise: A Guidebook, Hollnagel, Paries, Woods & Wreathall, 2011

 

 

©2016 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” and “Safely Working” are registered trademarks of Trailmarker Ltd.
∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

The Safely Working Project is focused wholly on employees and their health and well-being in the workplace.  The Project promotes useful guidance that does not depend on a safety professional or staff to facilitate in the workplace.

The Safely Working Project envisions a path to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

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Safely Leading as a Way of Work……

IMG_20150903_180610We introduced Safely Leading recently and explained that its roots are in the “New View” philosophy of workplace safety.  The Safely Working Project encourages organizations to adopt the “New View” philosophy.  However, that’s much easier said than done.  If you have read our discussion on the “New View,” it could be interpreted that an organization must have an effective safety program in place.  That’s not so.  We strongly believe that there is a greater likelihood of success when a program or system is influenced and guided by a strong workplace philosophy from the start.

The “New View” is not an all or none proposition, especially for organizations just getting started with a formal approach to safety.  Safely Leading is composed of the key tenets of the New View that can be applied at the beginning and will help establish the positive workplace culture we call a Safely Working Environment.  This is a learning culture where individual employees endeavor to be Safely Working 100% of the time, free from fear and positively supported by the organization.

Here are the six tenets of our Safely Leading philosophy based on our understanding of the “New View.”

  1. People matter more than anything else – Many organizations state that employees are their greatest asset.  They do the work; they get the job done; they contribute significantly to the success of the organization.  Not only do they get the job done, they do it by problem-solving and adapting to subtle changes in conditions; they are experts and bring pride to their roles; they are attentive and respond to negative and positive cues in the workplace, both subtle and obvious. That also makes them vulnerable to those same conditions and situations.
  2. Employees don’t come to work to get hurt – Employees come to work, at a minimum, to earn a living.  There are many important reasons for that paycheck – family, friends, hobbies, sports, the important things in life.  A minor injury may impact those things very little, but as an injury or illness gets more significant so does the impact on the employee.  Even the employee who pushes boundaries doesn’t want to get hurt.  Perception of risk is different for everyone.  Getting hurt can change an employee’s lifestyle or their life.  That’s not something employees consciously do.
  3. Accidents are not a choice – To successfully complete a specific task requires the right people, the right materials, the right tools, the right conditions, the right procedures, the right maintenance, the right protection… all at the right time.  A change in any one of those can cause a change in how the task or activity is completed resulting in failure or success.  Employees working under these changing or variable conditions contributes to the risk of an accident.  Accidents are the result of many factors that are more important to understand than suggesting an employee chooses to have an accident.
  4. Preparing to fail is prevention – Learning and planning for failure represent what is required to determine how to prevent an occurrence or event.  More importantly, this learning and planning must take place before the event.  If it is addressed as a result of the event, it is already too late.  Employees can be useful in this effort as they have knowledge of conditions that managers and supervisors may not observe or be in tune with.  Leverage the knowledge and expertise of employees to establish prevention as the solution.
  5. Don’t react, count to 6, then learn – All the learning that is done by studying successes and failures helps an organization understand what conditions lead to error and failure.  If an organization focuses on those conditions the risk of failure can be reduced. While the failure may not be totally avoidable, the consequences can be managed to the extent that the failure can be viewed as a success.  In other words, the consequences of the failure did not result in injury or property damage. A plan that relies on a standard procedure for correct completion of a task cannot address variability of conditions.  Plans need to take into consideration the learning – what went right in the past and what went wrong.
  6. Learning is everything – Learning is a result of studying not just what goes wrong, but what goes right.  If learning is not an important element of an organization’s mission, the organization will not grow.  It will not discover inefficiencies and it will not increase productivity.  Learning must be present at every level of the organization.  If it isn’t, then learning will not be sustained and will falter.  Employees take cues from leaders in an organization.  If learning isn’t important to a leader, then it won’t be important to the employee.

These six tenets provide a strong core philosophy that can be easily adopted.  As with every aspect of building a safety program it is imperative that you start small and simple.  You can’t do it all at the same time.  When employees understand they are part of the solution it will become easier to continue to build and expand your safety program.

Lastly, understand that the most important benefit of Safely Leading is that it can apply to all aspects of an organization.  Actually, it must be applied organization-wide.  By its nature a philosophy cannot propagate and succeed if its used universally.  A workplace safety culture is really just a reflection of the overall culture of the organization.  Different philosophies for different employees increases the complexity in the organization.  As we have said before, complexity results in more complexity and mistakes.

Safely Leading is the philosophy that promotes Safely Working as a Value!

 

If you want to learn more about the New View, check out Todd Conklin’s terrific podcast.  He interviews the 1st string players in the New View world.

http://preaccidentpodcast.podbean.com/

 

©2016 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” and “Safely Working” are registered trademarks of Trailmarker Ltd.
∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

The Safely Working Project is focused wholly on employees and their health and well-being in the workplace.  The Project promotes useful guidance that does not depend on a safety professional or staff to facilitate in the workplace.

The Safely Working Project envisions a path to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

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New Year’s Resolution for 2016: Ditch the Safety Culture…… Huh?

First, I want to wish IMG_20150901_093203you a Happy New Year!  I trust you had a joyous time with your family over the holidays.  That’s what it’s all about!

So, with the New Year come resolutions.  Is continuing to build a “Safety Culture” still at the top of your list?  I’m here to say, ditch it.  However, I don’t mean to imply that a safety culture is not important.  The intent is to suggest there is a better, more encompassing approach to maintaining a positive workplace culture where employees are Safely Working.

A Safety Culture or as we call it, a Safely Working Environment cannot achieve success if it is created in isolation from the rest of an organization.  A Safely Working Environment is the product or reflection of how an organization does everything, not just safety.  So, everyone in an organization should be contributing to a culture that supports all efforts that make an enterprise successful including values, wellness, health, leadership, quality and safety.

In keeping with our intent to provide simple, effective guidance The Safely Working Project offers 6 fundamental guidelines for an organization as a starting point.

  1. Be a learning organization.
  2. “How” is more important than “why ” in safety.
  3. Remember, no one comes to work to get hurt.
  4. Always keep it simple and sensible.
  5. Safely Working is a Value.
  6. Safe 6 is the one rule to rule them all.

Consider each carefully.  Don’t take them at face value.  Each has its own role in building and maintaining your positive workplace culture.

If “Safety Culture” has its own line item in your Safety/EHS Department budget, remove it.  Creating a positive workplace culture should be part of an organization’s job description.

Best wishes from all of us at The Safely Working Project!  Have a prosperous, positive and successful 2016.

 

©2016 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” and “Safely Working” are registered trademarks of Trailmarker Ltd.
∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

The Safely Working Project is focused wholly on employees and their health and well-being in the workplace.  The Project promotes useful guidance that does not depend on a safety professional or staff to facilitate in the workplace.

The Safely Working Project envisions a path to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

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Safely Leading with the “New View”

IMG_20150903_183256The Safely Working System includes the structure and elements needed for an organization to build a positive workplace culture.  It is based on the acknowledgement that Safely Working is a value and an essential element of quality.  By using the simple guidance developed by The Safely Working Project any size organization can build a such a culture, what we call, a Safely Working Environment.

The goal of creating a “Safety Culture” is not new and has been achieved by many organizations over the years.  While the Safely Working System provides the “what is needed,” the “how to make it work” is another matter.  To be an effective Safely Working Environment the culture must be one that values people and learning.  Employees must be free to speak up with suggestions, questions, problems and solutions.   The Safely Working Project believes strongly that the “New View” safety philosophy is what is needed to make a Safely Working Environment work.

The “New View” has been adopted by many very successful organizations.  Those organizations are committed to safety and recognize that compliance alone, is not enough.  The New View philosophy is reinforced using human and organizational performance techniques to manage the safety cultureFull implementation of the New View is beyond what the Safely Working System requires.  We encourage companies just getting started to use the Safely Leading approach.

Safely Leading is our implementation of the “New View” philosophy for workplace health and safety.  With the recognition that the workplace is a complex environment Safely Leading encourages employee involvement as well as helping them work and manage risk.  It also adopts the concept of a just culture – where the emphasis is on individual and organizational accountability, not culpability.  Employees need to be able to present problems and issues without fear.

The basic tenets of Safely Leading are:

  • People are the most important part of the organization
  • Employees don’t come to work to get hurt
  • Preparing to fail is prevention
  • Accidents are not a choice
  • Don’t react, count to 6, then learn
  • Learning leads to improvement

Safely Leading influences how the system works and succeeds.  It is not a safety program ― it is an organizational mindset, a people focus.  The positive impact of Safely Leading will be felt throughout everything the organization does – not just safety, but productivity and quality.

We will be providing a more specific discussion of Safely Leading and the “New View” in the coming weeks.  We are confident that you will find it simple and sensible just like all the guidance offered by The Safely Working Project.

 

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” and “Safely Working” are registered trademarks of Trailmarker Ltd.
∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

The Safely Working Project is focused wholly on employees and their health and well-being in the workplace.  The Project promotes useful guidance that does not depend on a safety professional or staff to facilitate in the workplace.

The Safely Working Project envisions a path to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

 

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What is an Antonym for Complex?

Is it reasonable for The Safely Working Project to say we can develop a simple system? Several online dictionaries define “system” using the terms “complex” and “detailed.”  But further digging revealed a definition on BusinessDictionary.com applicable to Safely Working™:

  1. An organized, purposeful structure that consists of interrelated and interdependent elements (components, entities, factors, members, parts etc.). These elements continually influence one another (directly or indirectly) to maintain their activity and the existence of the system, in order to achieve the goal of the system.

That works for us and reflects our intentions for the Safely Working™ System.  However, our commitment is to avoid complexity but, it is a slippery slope.  As we did recently with complexity, we performed a quick search on the Internet for “simplicity breeds…”  The results included happiness, satisfaction, clarity, success, performance and efficiency.  What a surprise.  We want to live there!

Anyway, we are designing the Safely Working™ System to be simple.  If it is perceived as complex or too detailed to be set-up and used by non-technical employees we’ve failed.  We are not programmed for failure!

The Safely Working™ System involves priorities, activities, skills, communication, supervision, and knowledge designed to promote a culture of employees working 100% safe 100% of the time.  This culture is referred to as a Safely Working™ Environment.  The goal of creating a “Safety Culture” is not new and has been achieved by many organizations over the years.

As with any type of success, sustaining the culture is a challenge, if only from personnel and management changes.  Using Safe 6 as the focal point of a Safely Working™ Environment assures continuity of the safety culture.  Safe 6 encompasses all aspects of getting the job done.  It does not work in IMG_20150903_181013isolation to the task.  It is integral to the task.  Safe 6 provides a frame of reference for procedures, practices, plans and programs.

To be effective, Safely Working™ must be a value held by employees and supervisors.  Safely Working™ encourages employees to use Sensible Care, not depend upon common sense.  It is the employer’s responsibility to assure the Sensible aspect of Safely Working™ guidance and information through training and mentoring.  The Care aspect is the employee’s responsibility to use the guidance provided by the employer correctly and safely.

The Safely Working™ System can be implemented easily by organizations that don’t have an EHS department or safety professional.  By using the simple guidance developed by The Safely Working Project any size organization can build a Safely Working™ Environment.  Getting started requires little more than a commitment to Safe 6® and orienting employees to it.

An organization with an EHS department or safety professional can benefit significantly from incorporating The Safely Working™ System into their workplace.  It complements top down safety programs and simplifies training development and presentation.  Integrating the System can be accomplished by starting with a single process and rolling it out according to plan.

In either case, it is an effective tool for organizations to provide a workplace where each employee can work 100% safe 100% of the time.

 

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

The Safely Working Project is focused wholly on employees and their health and well-being in the workplace.  The Project promotes useful guidance that does not depend on a safety professional or staff to facilitate in the workplace.

The Safely Working Project envisions a path to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

 

 

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Just the FAQs, Please……

IMG_20150903_182346

 

We’ve added a Safely Working FAQs page to SafelyWorking.net.  There are short explanations of several key concepts and terms promoted by The Safely Working Project.

There is also information on how you can get permission to use of the concepts and information found on our web sites.

 

 

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

The Safely Working Project is focused wholly on employees and their health and well-being in the workplace.  The Project promotes useful guidance that does not depend on a safety professional or staff to facilitate in the workplace.

The Safely Working Project envisions a path to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

Share