It Sure Looks Good on Paper ……

You now have a wonderful training plan using our guidance.  Training your employees is the next step.  Let’s consider for a minute what will drive successful training.  Of course it begins with a solid plan based on the guidance we have been discussing.  However, a plan that remains on the shelf and not effectively implemented is no plan at all.  So who delivers the training?  Chose one of the following:

a. Instructor – a person that instructs
b. Teacher – a person that teaches
c. Trainer – a person that trains
d. Educator – a person that educates
e. Leader – a person that leads

How many of you selected “c” as the best answer?  Sure, “c” is always a safe choice unless there is an “e. All of the above” choice.  Not a choice here—well, actually our “e” choice is a combination of “All of the above” and more.  While a Leader may not be employed or certified as an instructor, teacher, educator or trainer, a Leader does all that and more.  Consider this definition of a Leader from www.thefreedictionary.com:

1. a person who rules, guides, or inspires others

That’s who should do the training!  Who are the leaders in your workplace?  They are your supervisors, foremen, and team leaders.  They are the ones working day-to-day, hour-to-hour with employees.  They have the safety meetings, mentor employees and have corrective conversations as needed.  Who would be better than a supervisor?  Of course someone has to train the supervisor.  That would be an expert who may be on staff or retained by the employer.

The Safely Working Project believes strongly that supervisors hold a key role in creating and maintaining a Safely Working™ Environment through leadership and employee training.  We discussed the role of the supervisor in a post a while back on Safely Supervising.  Consider supporting and encouraging your supervisors to earn the STS certification (Safely Trained Supervisor).  The investment will go a long way in maintaining a Safely Working™ Environment.

 

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

While we believe what The Safely Working Project is promoting is useful to all employers and safety professionals, our efforts are directed at those small businesses that can’t afford or don’t have a safety professional to facilitate workplace safety.

The Safely Working Project is an approach to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

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We All Remember “K.I.S.S.” ……

With apologies to the U.S. Navy who coined “Keep It Simple, Stupid,” The Safely Working Project is modifying K.I.S.S. to “Keep It Simple and Sensible.”  That fits quite nicely with the intent of the Safely Working™ Environment and strikes at the same objective as all the K.I.S.S. variants.  (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KISS_principle)

We now have all the pieces to assemble a “simple and sensible” training plan without any special assistance.   We’ve identified our different training audiences and introduced guidance on learning domains to focus your training development and delivery efforts.  With Safe 6® as the one workplace rule we use that to structure and define our training plan.

Now we are ready to develop a 6 Ed Training Brief.  This is a simple lesson plan that lists the training objectives and how they will be achieved.  Let’s build on our recommendation that we use the Safe 6® Brief to establish training objectives.  At the same time we need to identify who our audience is for the training.  Are we training supervisors or general employees?  Looking at the learning domains we see that more is expected of the supervisor (Leader) than for a new hire (Unassigned).

 Employee

Knowledge

Skills Attitude
Unassigned Recall None Receive
Leader Analyze and
problem solve
Precision and
articulation
Value System

Assemble all the information and guidance you already have on the topic.  This might include a Safe 6® Brief and a Danger Check.  Don’t worry if you don’t have them yet.  You can develop them at the same time.  We are assuming you are ahead of the curve and giving yourself plenty of time for this effort.  Make a simple one page form and type the topic name and the following paragraph at the top:

Please identify 6 concerns or elements that are critical to this training topic. These may be related to mishaps, disciplinary issues, needed skills, knowledge, or anything else that should be included in the training session. Your response will be used to develop specific training objectives for this topic.

Distribute this form to your safety committee and to supervisors and managers.  If you can complete it during a safety committee meeting, definitely do it.  If not, give a 2-3 day deadline.  It shouldn’t take long for them to do.  Collect all the responses and tabulate them on a white board or paper.  Record the responses starting with the most popular.

Next, assign each response to the appropriate step in Safe 6®.  If you haven’t prepared a Safe 6® Brief you have a start and you can fill in the gaps now or later.  Now that you have organized the responses using Safe 6 it is time to review each point and determine where it fits into the KSA learning domains.

Do your best to take each point and turn it into a training objective — what should the employee be able to do once the training is complete.  If specific skills are needed, they can’t be taught using videos — hands-on training will be necessary.

Review the completed Training Brief with your safety committee and the person assigned to do the training.  Revise the Brief accordingly.  This doesn’t have to be perfect the first time.  The fact is there should always be a continual effort to improve training.

There’s been no mention of OSHA training regulations.  The responses you get should have OSHA covered and then some.  After you have finished putting the 6 Ed Brief together you can go back to the OSHA regulations and fill in any gaps or deficiencies.  Chances are, you will have the practical information and skills identified already.

 

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

While we believe what The Safely Working Project is promoting is useful to all employers and safety professionals, our efforts are directed at those small businesses that can’t afford or don’t have a safety professional to facilitate workplace safety.

The Safely Working Project is an approach to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

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It’s All About Content……

Safelyworking.net would have little value other than as a placeholder if it didn’t have content.  There would be no reason to visit the site.  If we want repeat visitors the site must be interesting.  If you want effective training, it must have content and it must be interesting and engaging.  We’re going to focus on types of content to present in training.  These are recommendations developed by The Safely Working Project.

Before we get too far along we should take a moment to define training.  Wikipedia describes training this way:

Training is teaching, or developing in oneself or others, any skills and knowledge that relate to specific useful competencies. Training has specific goals of improving one’s capability, capacity, productivity and performance. (From <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Training> )

That says it well.  Employers encounter training requirements not only from OSHA but also from industry standards, trade groups and corporate dictates.  Sometimes employers may be required to pre-qualify for a job or project by documenting that employees have been trained to stated specifications.  The required training can range from the basic transfer of information to competency based learning for skills.

In our model training mission statement (here) we included this sentence: “Our employees will be informed and familiar with all processes, policies, plans, programs, practices and procedures relevant to their duties.”  These are the 6 priorities of how an employer implements and maintains a Safely Working Environment.  We defined each as a part of the “chassis” in a recent post.

It’s logical to use the 6 Priorities for determining training plan content.  In the table below we have assigned one or more of the priorities to each training group.  As responsibility increases to the higher training groups the training accumulates from the lower levels.

Training Content

UnassignedInformation – policies and processes
Assigned: Training and Awareness – practices
Authorized: Training – practices and procedures
Leader: Training – procedures and plans
Expert: Training – practices, procedures, plans, programs
Manager: Training and Awareness – programs, plans

For instance, a Leader must be trained on procedures and plans, but also practices, policies and processes.  If we apply the learning domains discussed in the post on learning domains we can consider those learning behaviors accordingly.  As applied to practices, procedures, plans and programs, the expert must have the knowledge and ability to synthesize and evaluate; the skills associated with a competent person; and the attitude that reflects a value system of Safely Working™.

In this and the prior posts on training we have offered a simple approach to training.  In general, we have established training groups, training behaviors and training content.  It is clear that wall-to-wall training is not appropriate for most content in your training plan.  The training plan should be based on roles and responsibilities.  Just like a budget, the training plan needs to have each level described and justified if it is expected to be effectively executed.

Now it’s all about execution!

 

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

While we believe what The Safely Working Project is promoting is useful to all employers and safety professionals, our efforts are directed at those small businesses that can’t afford or don’t have a safety professional to facilitate workplace safety.

The Safely Working Project is an approach to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

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True-False and Multiple Choice……

Sorry, I didn’t have time to prepare an exam on “6 Education.”  I’ll trust that you took a look at the information on Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Domains.   Here’s a good summary of the three learning domains.  Note that each element listed in the domain builds on the previous elements.  For instance, within the cognitive domain, analyzing is based on the ability to apply knowledge that is understood.

Cognitive – Knowledge

  1. Recall data (I say… I do…)
  2. Understand (You say… I do, you say…)
  3. Apply (use) (You say… You do)
  4. Analyze (structure/elements)
  5. Synthesize (create/build)
  6. Evaluate (assess, judge in relational terms)

Psychomotor – Skills

  1. Imitation (copy)
  2. Manipulation (follow instructions)
  3. Develop Precision
  4. Articulation (combine, integrate related skills)
  5. Naturalization (automate, become expert)

Affective – Attitude

  1. Receive (awareness)
  2. Respond (react)
  3. Value (understand and act)
  4. Organize personal value system
  5. Internalize value system (adopt behavior)

Designing a training plan for your workplace should be based on these domains.  If we use the 6 training groups we can use the domains to define our specific training objectives.  Frankly, they are also appropriate when developing job descriptions.  Remember, it is always prudent to design a plan or program so it can be easily evaluated on a regular basis.  Specific objective and descriptions make evaluation possible.

Here’s how we’ve applied the Bloom’s Learning Domains to our 6 training groups:

Knowledge Skills Attitude Job Title Other Factors
Unassigned Recall None Receive All employees New and unaffected
Assigned Understand Imitation Respond Unskilled labor Initial assignment
Authorized Apply Manipulation Value Skilled labor Experience
Leader Analyze and problem solve Precision and articulation Value System Supervisor Experience and responsibility
Expert Synthesize and evaluate Competent person Value System EHS staff Education and experience
Manager Apply Imitation Value System Management Responsibility

Consider the matrix above and consider whether it could be applied to your workplace.  Our next post will expand the matrix with more training guidance.

 

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

While we believe what The Safely Working Project is promoting is useful to all employers and safety professionals, our efforts are directed at those small businesses that can’t afford or don’t have a safety professional to facilitate workplace safety.

The Safely Working Project is an approach to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

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It’s Time We Talked About “6 Education” ……

We’ve alluded to it for months.  It’s something we’d rather not discuss because of what it implies.  Its importance goes without saying.  But, we can’t rely on learning about it from unreliable sources or attempting it on our own.  The ramifications are too significant.  That’s why we must talk about “6 Education” to prevent any misunderstanding.

Training, focused and effective training that is, should be an element of a business plan as much as a detailed budget.  The fact is employee training can make or break a budget.  I don’t mean the cost of training, but the benefit of training.  A well designed and executed training plan has everything to do with quality and productivity.  Mishaps, whether they are close calls or injuries, cost time and money.  Trained employees working under trained supervisors have the best opportunity to be safely working.  Remember, a Safely Working Environment means 100% Safe 100% of the Time.

The tendency is to do one type of training – wall-to-wall training – the same training for everyone.  Great in concept – everyone gets the same information, but that’s all it is, information.  For training to have a chance to be effective it must be designed and delivered in a manner consistent with job responsibilities and conditions.  That means one size fits all training is not an option.  But it doesn’t have to be complicated.

The Safely Working Project has a simple approach to training that leverages the concepts described in Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Domains.  The learning domains are Cognitive, Affective and Psychomotor – or more simply: knowledge, attitude and skills.  Each domain is characterized by specific characteristics that describe a desired learning outcome.  Each succeeding outcome within a domain represents an increased level of capability.  That means employees that have reached higher levels of capability are candidates for greater responsibility.  Better yet, those employees with more responsibility need increased levels of training to maximize their capabilities.

Back to our approach to training.  We have used Bloom’s Learning Domains to help define logical categories of training groups within an organization.  These categories also factor experience and responsibility.  Ultimately, Bloom’s Domains are used to establish specific learning objectives for training.  The 6 training groups are:

  • Unassigned employees – New employees
  • Assigned employees – Employees newly assigned to a specific job or department; required work area specific knowledge of activity requirements
  • Authorized employees – Employee with special training and experience to complete activities and tasks that require additional skill and responsibility
  • Leaders – A supervisor, foreman, team leader responsible for one of more employees and their activities
  • Experts – A competent person, qualified person or other necessary expertise to support on-going specialized activities and tasks
  • Managers – A person, other than a “Leader” that is responsible for coordinating overall activities and support from outside the work area

By their labels we can see a hierarchy that suggests different or increasing levels of training needed for each group.   Actually, the top of the hierarchy are the experts, not managers.  Managers need to have certain knowledge and expertise.   They might have been experts in the past, but may no longer be providing and maintaining that expertise.  Managers usually have the big picture and the ability to interact effectively with Leaders and Experts.

We will further define each training group and provide guidance on exactly what training objectives are needed in coming posts.  Remember, establishing a budget is challenging at first.  But once the structure and function is determined it serves as a template that makes the process easy to revise and amend.  The same holds for a training plan.

Your assignment is to review these links to gain a basic understanding of the Learning Domains.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloom%27s_Taxonomy

http://www.businessballs.com/bloomstaxonomyoflearningdomains.htm

There is an exam.  (optional, never mind)

 

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

While we believe what The Safely Working Project is promoting is useful to all employers and safety professionals, our efforts are directed at those small businesses that can’t afford or don’t have a safety professional to facilitate workplace safety.

The Safely Working Project is an approach to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

 

 

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