MOTELS – Organizational……

organizationIs Safely Working dominant in your workplace?  What potential problems exist that are influenced or directed by your organization?  Is there adequate time to plan and complete the task?  Are the appropriate persons involved?  Have all procedures and guidelines been identified?  Can you get the job done without interference from the public or other employers?  Is the leadership support present to assure proper completion of the task?

 

Time; Procedures; Planning; Communications; Behavior; Leadership; Security; Multi-Employer Sites

MOTELS….. Safe 6……. No connection with the “keep the lights on” folks.  Our MOTELS is an acronym, not a hotel chain.  Each letter represents a category of potentially dangerous activities or conditions.  By now you can recite the Safe 6 and know that the first step is “Recognize all the Dangers.”  Everything associated with the rest of Safe 6 relies on an understanding of those dangers.

See MOTELS

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

While we believe what The Safely Working Project is promoting is useful to all employers and safety professionals, our efforts are directed at those small businesses that can’t afford or don’t have a safety professional to facilitate workplace safety.

The Safely Working Project is an approach to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

Share

It’s All About Content……

Safelyworking.net would have little value other than as a placeholder if it didn’t have content.  There would be no reason to visit the site.  If we want repeat visitors the site must be interesting.  If you want effective training, it must have content and it must be interesting and engaging.  We’re going to focus on types of content to present in training.  These are recommendations developed by The Safely Working Project.

Before we get too far along we should take a moment to define training.  Wikipedia describes training this way:

Training is teaching, or developing in oneself or others, any skills and knowledge that relate to specific useful competencies. Training has specific goals of improving one’s capability, capacity, productivity and performance. (From <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Training> )

That says it well.  Employers encounter training requirements not only from OSHA but also from industry standards, trade groups and corporate dictates.  Sometimes employers may be required to pre-qualify for a job or project by documenting that employees have been trained to stated specifications.  The required training can range from the basic transfer of information to competency based learning for skills.

In our model training mission statement (here) we included this sentence: “Our employees will be informed and familiar with all processes, policies, plans, programs, practices and procedures relevant to their duties.”  These are the 6 priorities of how an employer implements and maintains a Safely Working Environment.  We defined each as a part of the “chassis” in a recent post.

It’s logical to use the 6 Priorities for determining training plan content.  In the table below we have assigned one or more of the priorities to each training group.  As responsibility increases to the higher training groups the training accumulates from the lower levels.

Training Content

UnassignedInformation – policies and processes
Assigned: Training and Awareness – practices
Authorized: Training – practices and procedures
Leader: Training – procedures and plans
Expert: Training – practices, procedures, plans, programs
Manager: Training and Awareness – programs, plans

For instance, a Leader must be trained on procedures and plans, but also practices, policies and processes.  If we apply the learning domains discussed in the post on learning domains we can consider those learning behaviors accordingly.  As applied to practices, procedures, plans and programs, the expert must have the knowledge and ability to synthesize and evaluate; the skills associated with a competent person; and the attitude that reflects a value system of Safely Working™.

In this and the prior posts on training we have offered a simple approach to training.  In general, we have established training groups, training behaviors and training content.  It is clear that wall-to-wall training is not appropriate for most content in your training plan.  The training plan should be based on roles and responsibilities.  Just like a budget, the training plan needs to have each level described and justified if it is expected to be effectively executed.

Now it’s all about execution!

 

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

While we believe what The Safely Working Project is promoting is useful to all employers and safety professionals, our efforts are directed at those small businesses that can’t afford or don’t have a safety professional to facilitate workplace safety.

The Safely Working Project is an approach to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

Share

Thank You!

Thanks to all the professional trainers that attended my presentation Tuesday morning at the PETE/NESHTA Conference in Rochester.  My talk was called “Safe 6: Key to a Safely Working Environment.”  As always, I enjoyed promoting my passion, The Safely Working Project.

Share

MOTELS – Material Handling……

mat handling

Does your task require moving or handling materials, supplies or people?   What are going to use to handle the loads? Is it rated for the load and inspected? Are you authorized to operate the necessary equipment?

Manual; Mechanical; Motorized; Rigging; Transportation

 

MOTELS….. Safe 6……. No connection with the “keep the lights on” folks.  Our MOTELS is an acronym, not a hotel chain.  Each letter represents a category of potentially dangerous activities or conditions.  By now you can recite the Safe 6 and know that the first step is “Recognize all the Dangers.”  Everything associated with the rest of Safe 6 relies on an understanding of those dangers.

See MOTELS

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

While we believe what The Safely Working Project is promoting is useful to all employers and safety professionals, our efforts are directed at those small businesses that can’t afford or don’t have a safety professional to facilitate workplace safety.

The Safely Working Project is an approach to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

Share

True-False and Multiple Choice……

Sorry, I didn’t have time to prepare an exam on “6 Education.”  I’ll trust that you took a look at the information on Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Domains.   Here’s a good summary of the three learning domains.  Note that each element listed in the domain builds on the previous elements.  For instance, within the cognitive domain, analyzing is based on the ability to apply knowledge that is understood.

Cognitive – Knowledge

  1. Recall data (I say… I do…)
  2. Understand (You say… I do, you say…)
  3. Apply (use) (You say… You do)
  4. Analyze (structure/elements)
  5. Synthesize (create/build)
  6. Evaluate (assess, judge in relational terms)

Psychomotor – Skills

  1. Imitation (copy)
  2. Manipulation (follow instructions)
  3. Develop Precision
  4. Articulation (combine, integrate related skills)
  5. Naturalization (automate, become expert)

Affective – Attitude

  1. Receive (awareness)
  2. Respond (react)
  3. Value (understand and act)
  4. Organize personal value system
  5. Internalize value system (adopt behavior)

Designing a training plan for your workplace should be based on these domains.  If we use the 6 training groups we can use the domains to define our specific training objectives.  Frankly, they are also appropriate when developing job descriptions.  Remember, it is always prudent to design a plan or program so it can be easily evaluated on a regular basis.  Specific objective and descriptions make evaluation possible.

Here’s how we’ve applied the Bloom’s Learning Domains to our 6 training groups:

Knowledge Skills Attitude Job Title Other Factors
Unassigned Recall None Receive All employees New and unaffected
Assigned Understand Imitation Respond Unskilled labor Initial assignment
Authorized Apply Manipulation Value Skilled labor Experience
Leader Analyze and problem solve Precision and articulation Value System Supervisor Experience and responsibility
Expert Synthesize and evaluate Competent person Value System EHS staff Education and experience
Manager Apply Imitation Value System Management Responsibility

Consider the matrix above and consider whether it could be applied to your workplace.  Our next post will expand the matrix with more training guidance.

 

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

While we believe what The Safely Working Project is promoting is useful to all employers and safety professionals, our efforts are directed at those small businesses that can’t afford or don’t have a safety professional to facilitate workplace safety.

The Safely Working Project is an approach to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

Share

Step 6: Guard Against Mishaps

guardBe attentive.  Know all emergency switches, alarms, evacuation routes, spill supplies, fire extinguishers, first aid stations, emergency showers and eye washes.  Be aware of any change in conditions that can adversely affect the safe completion of your task.  Act immediately when something goes wrong.  Protect yourself, notify others in the area and your supervisor.  Follow your company procedures for the type of incident.

 

See “The Safe 6 Pack

©2015 The Safely Working Project & P.D. Shafer III

“Safe 6” is a registered trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.
“Safely Working” is a trademark of Trailmarker Ltd.

∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼∼

While we believe what The Safely Working Project is promoting is useful to all employers and safety professionals, our efforts are directed at those small businesses that can’t afford or don’t have a safety professional to facilitate workplace safety.

The Safely Working Project is an approach to workplace safety that is driven by employees and supervisors.  This is fundamentally different from the traditional Safety Program where an EHS Professional manages workplace safety.  So, instead of top down safety, Safely Working™ endeavors to succeed from the ground up. “We’re turning safety upside down.”

Share